The Carnivorous Plant FAQ v. 11.5
- courtesy of -
The International Carnivorous Plant Society

Q: What are Location Coded sites like?

A: Below is a description of Location Code sites from which the ICPS distributed plants in its conservation program in 2003. For an explanation of Location Codes, look at the previous web page. The ICPS will, under no conditions, reveal the identity of these locations. Conservation partners that work with the ICPS have the assurance that they can cooperate with the ICPS in helping distribute plants with Location Codes and that their sites will stay protected and unrevealed. (The ICPS is fully aware that if it revealed the identities of the Location Coded sites, it would never be able to hope for further cooperation with its conservation partners!)

AL001
This is a site in central Alabama that houses Sarracenia alabamensis subsp. alabamensis. The quality of the site is fairly good, with many plants that flower vigorously every year. The plants are growing on the edge of an underground clay dome that squeezes the water to the surface. This site has a reasonable amount of topography---the plants are definitely growing on the side of a hill. The plants tended to be a little on the short side when I saw them, but might have been because the year was very dry. The plants grew among many pine trees, and as a result were a little etiolated in places.

AL002
AL002

AL003
AL003
AL002
This is a small, flat site in central Alabama that houses Sarracenia alabamensis subsp. alabamensis. The site has a good supply of water (there is even a nicely snake-infested stream nearby), but it is enclosed on all sides by dense vegetation (both native and non-native). With just a few years of neglect, the vegetation could close in on the site. Fortunately, the owners burn the site regularly so this is not (as yet) a problem. The plants at this site are different from the others I have seen in that they tend to form dense clusters of pitchers---each clump is about 60 cm (2 feet) in diameter. The photo to the right shows a single clump early in the season---many dead pitchers from the previous year are still visible.

AL003
This is a large, very gently sloping site in central Alabama that houses Sarracenia alabamensis subsp. alabamensis. The quality of the site is the best I had ever seen---the plants were growing in full sun with plenty of strong light and plentiful water which was squeezed to the surface by an underground clay dome (even during a drought year that I saw it). The plants are really beautiful!


Page citations: Rice, B.A. 2001a; Rice, B.A. 2003a; personal observation.

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Revised: January 2007
©Barry Rice, 2005